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Aspergillus sensitization associated with current asthma in children in the United States: an analysis of data from the 2005-2006 NHANES
Hui-Ju Wen, Shu-Li Wang, Ming-Chieh Li, Yue Leon Guo
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022099.   Published online October 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022099
  • 687 View
  • 58 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study investigated the association between allergen sensitization and current asthma in children in the United States using data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).
METHODS
Children who participated in the 2005–2006 NHANES, aged 6 years to 19 years, were included in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess asthma status (without asthma, asthma in remission, or current asthma). Nineteen specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) levels were measured using the Pharmacia Diagnostics ImmunoCAP 1000 System (Kalamazoo, MI, USA). A machine-learning method was applied to select important sIgEs related to childhood asthma. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test this hypothesis.
RESULTS
In total, 2,875 children were recruited. The prevalence of ever having asthma and current asthma was 16.5% and 5.6%, respectively. Six sIgE levels were found to contribute to asthma using bootstrap forest selection. After adjusting for the child’s sex, age, and family income, children with double the sIgE levels of Dermatophagoides farinae, dogs, and Aspergillus were more likely to have current asthma than children without asthma (odds ratio [95% confident interval]: 1.11 [1.04 to 1.19], 1.30 [1.16 to 1.46], and 1.55 [1.39 to 1.72], respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings suggest that allergen sensitization, especially to Aspergillus, is associated with current asthma in children. Strategies to reduce sensitization may help prevent and manage asthma.
Summary
Korean summary
Key Message
Epidemiological data on nutritional disorders and outcomes in hospitalized Thai children: an analysis of data from the National Health Database 2015-2019
Suchaorn Saengnipanthkul, Jeeraparn Phosuwattanakul, Kaewjai Thepsuthammarat, Nalinee Chongviriyaphan
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022047.   Published online May 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022047
  • 3,544 View
  • 228 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Malnutrition in hospitalized patients is a frequently overlooked health issue. We aimed to assess the prevalence and pattern of nutritional disorders in hospitalized Thai children from the National Health Database.
METHODS
Hospitalized children aged 1 month to 18 years diagnosed with nutritional disorders between 2015 and 2019 were retrospectively reviewed using the National Health Security Office data. Based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, Clinical Modification, nutritional disorders were classified into 3 major forms of malnutrition: undernutrition (E40-E46), overweight and obesity (E66), and micronutrient deficiencies (D50-D53, E50-E56, E58, E60-E61, and E63).
RESULTS
Out of 5,188,033 hospitalized children, malnutrition was identified in 115,254 (2.2%). Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), overweight and obesity, and micronutrient deficiencies were prevalent in 0.21%, 0.27%, and 1.81%, respectively. Among those with micronutrient deficiencies, 95.0% had iron deficiency anemia, 2.2% had vitamin D deficiency, and 0.7% had zinc deficiency. Children aged under 5 years mostly had PEM, followed by iron deficiency anemia. Teenagers commonly had obesity and vitamin D deficiency. Patients with PEM who were admitted with common diseases had significantly longer hospital stays and higher hospital costs and mortality rates than those without PEM.
CONCLUSIONS
Hospitalized children had various nutritional disorders, particularly PEM, which was associated with higher morbidity and mortality. Nutritional screening tools should be utilized for the early detection and treatment of malnutrition. Specific International Classification of Diseases codes for nutritional care services and intervention should be available. Additionally, nutritional interventions should be reimbursed, along with nutritional education and empowerment of healthcare providers, to improve hospital care service and improve patient outcomes.
Summary
Korean summary
Key Message
Malnutrition is common among hospitalized Thai children, particularly protein energy malnutrition; it increases mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs as well as exerts long-term effects on growth and development. Prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing over the past 5 years, the vast majority involved patients 5 – 13 years of age.
Age-specific effects of ozone on pneumonia in Korean children and adolescents: a nationwide time-series study
Kyoung-Nam Kim, Youn-Hee Lim, Sanghyuk Bae, In Gyu Song, Soontae Kim, Yun-Chul Hong
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022002.   Published online December 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022002
  • 6,309 View
  • 448 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to estimate the age-specific effects of 8-hour maximum ozone levels on pneumonia in children and adolescents.
METHODS
We performed quasi-Poisson regression analyses for individuals of 0-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, and 15-19 years of age using nationwide time-series data from the Korea (2011-2015). We constructed distributed lag linear models employing a generalized difference-in-differences method and controlling for other air pollutants.
RESULTS
A 10.0-parts per billion increase in 8-hour maximum ozone levels was associated with a higher risk of hospital admissions due to pneumonia at 0-4 (relative risk [RR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.03) and 5-9 years of age (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.08), but not at 10-14 (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.04) or 15-19 years of age (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.06). The association between ozone and hospital admissions due to pneumonia was stronger in cool seasons (from November to April) than in warm seasons (from May to October), but was similar between boys and girls.
CONCLUSIONS
Short-term exposure to ozone was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia at 0-4 years and 5-9 years of age, but not at 10-14 years or 15-19 years of age. Our findings can help identify vulnerable periods, determine the target populations for public health interventions, and establish air pollution standards.
Summary
Korean summary
-어린이와 청소년에서 대기오염물질인 오존에 단기 노출되었을 때 폐렴으로 인한 입원 위험이 증가하는지를 건강보험공단 청구자료를 이용하여 구축한 시계열자료로 분석하였다. -0-4세, 5-9세 군에서는 오존 단기 노출 시 폐렴으로 인한 입원 위험이 증가하였으나 10-14세, 15-19세 군에서는 입원 위험 증가가 관찰되지 않았다.
Key Message
• The effects of ozone levels on hospital admissions for pneumonia were evaluated. • We used quasi-Poisson time-series models and a difference-in-differences method. • Ozone levels increased hospital admissions for pneumonia at ages 0–4 and 5–9 years. • Evidence for the effects of ozone levels on pneumonia was not found at older ages.
Recovery time from severe acute malnutrition and associated factors among under-5 children in Yekatit 12 Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study
Mekonen Adimasu, Girum Sebsibie, Fikrtemariam Abebe, Getaneh Baye, Kerebih Abere
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020003.   Published online February 2, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020003
  • 10,370 View
  • 285 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Recovery time from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is often a neglected topic despite its clinical impact. Although a few studies have examined nutritional recovery time, the length of hospitalization in those studies varied greatly. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the recovery time from SAM and to identify predictors of length of hospitalization among under-5 children.
METHODS
A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 423 under-5 children with SAM who had been admitted to Yekatit 12 Hospital. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate time to nutritional recovery, and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to determine independent predictors.
RESULTS
The nutritional recovery rate was 81.3%, and the median recovery time was 15.00 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.61 to 16.39). Age, daily weight gain per kilogram of body weight, vaccination status, and the existence of at least 1 comorbidity (e.g., pneumonia, stunting, shock, and deworming) were found to be significant independent predictors of nutritional recovery time. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for nutritional recovery decreased by 1.9% for every 1-month increase in child age (aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97 to 0.99).
CONCLUSIONS
The overall nutritional recovery time in this study was within the Sphere standards. However, approximately 13.0% of children stayed in the hospital for more than 28.00 days, which is an unacceptably large proportion. Daily weight gain of ≥8 g/kg, full vaccination, and deworming with albendazole or mebendazole reduced nutritional recovery time. Conversely, older age, pneumonia, stunting, and shock increased nutritional recovery time.
Summary
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Key Message

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comorbidities of Child Malnutrition in Low- and Medium-Income Countries: A Systematic Review
    Tshepiso Moate, Tinda Rabie, Catharina Minnie, Anne Mäenpää
    Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition.2022; 75(4): 400.     CrossRef
  • Severe acute malnutrition’s recovery rate still below the minimum standard: predictors of time to recovery among 6- to 59-month-old children in the healthcare setting of Southwest Ethiopia
    Seyum Ebissa Eyi, Gebiso Roba Debele, Efrem Negash, Kebebe Bidira, Debela Tarecha, Kabtamu Nigussie, Mohammedamin Hajure, Mohammedjud Hassen Ahmed, Bilisumamulifna Tefera Kefeni
    Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preparation and quality characterization of marine small pelagic fish powder: A novel ready-to-use nutritious food product for vulnerable populations
    Abdullah-Al Mamun, Shuva Bhowmik, Md. Shahid Sarwar, Sharmin Akter, Tanjina Pias, MUM Abu Zakaria, Md. Monirul Islam, Hillary Egna, Ford Evans, Md Abdul Wahab, Shakuntala Haraksingh Thilsted, David C. Little
    Measurement: Food.2022; 8: 100067.     CrossRef
  • Assessment, outcomes and implications of multiple anthropometric deficits in children
    Idzes Kundan, Rajalakshmi Nair, Shashwat Kulkarni, Aparna Deshpande, Raju Jotkar, Mrudula Phadke
    BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.2021; 4(1): 267.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for severe acute malnutrition among children aged 6–59 months: A community-based case-control study from Vellore, Southern India
    SamM David, RubyA Pricilla, SherinS Paul, Kuryan George, Anuradha Bose, JasminH Prasad
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(5): 2237.     CrossRef
  • Time to Recovery and Its Predictors among Children 6–59 Months Admitted with Severe Acute Malnutrition to East Amhara Hospitals, Northeast Ethiopia: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study
    Telahun Kasa Tefera, Solomon Mekonnen Abebe, Melkamu Tamir Hunegnaw, Freezer Girma Mekasha
    Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-positive children at Adama Referral Hospital and Medical College, Oromia, Ethiopia: a retrospective follow-up study
Masino Tessu Beshir, Aklil Hailu Beyene, Kenean Getaneh Tlaye, Tefera Mulugeta Demelew
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019028.   Published online June 22, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019028
  • 10,930 View
  • 293 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Tuberculosis (TB) is common in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but its effect on the survival of HIV-infected children is not well understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the incidence and predictors of active TB among HIV-positive children at Adama Referral Hospital and Medical College, Oromia, Ethiopia.
METHODS
A retrospective study was conducted over 5 years using a checklist to gather data from 428 randomly selected pediatric patient charts. The checklist was adapted from the standardized antiretroviral therapy (ART) follow-up form currently used by the institution’s ART clinic. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariable analysis using Cox regression proportional hazards models, as appropriate. Survival was calculated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests.
RESULTS
Of the 466 charts reviewed, 428 patient records were included in the analysis. A total of 67 new TB cases were observed during the follow-up period. Hence, the incidence rate in this cohort was found to be 6.03 per 100 child-years of observation. A baseline hemoglobin level <10 g/dL (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 7.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 48.15), moderate wasting (aHR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.02 to 7.99), and not receiving isoniazid preventive therapy (aHR, 8.23; 95% CI, 2.11 to 32.06) were among the independent predictors of TB occurrence.
CONCLUSIONS
The incidence of TB was high, particularly in pre-ART patients receiving chronic care for HIV. Close followup of HIV-positive children is crucial to protect them against the development of TB. Initiating isoniazid preventive therapy, averting malnutrition, and managing anemia are also of significant importance.
Summary
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Key Message

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence and Predictors of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Children Who Received Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), Northwest Ethiopia: A Multicenter Historical Cohorts Study 2009–2019
    Fassikaw Kebede, Habtamu Tarekegn, Mulugeta Molla, Dube Jara, Abebe Abate, Maoshui Wang
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Global trends, regional differences and age distribution for the incidence of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection from 1990 to 2019: results from the global burden of disease study 2019
    Yaping Wang, Wenzhan Jing, Jue Liu, Min Liu
    Infectious Diseases.2022; 54(11): 773.     CrossRef
  • Bayesian parametric modeling of time to tuberculosis co-infection of HIV/AIDS patients at Jimma Medical Center, Ethiopia
    Abdi Kenesa Umeta, Samuel Fikadu Yermosa, Abdisa G. Dufera
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis prevalence, incidence and prevention in a south african cohort of children living with HIV
    Gloria Ebelechukwu Anyalechi, Rommel Bain, Gurpreet Kindra, Mary Mogashoa, Nonzwakazi Sogaula, Anthony Mutiti, Stephen Arpadi, Emilia Rivadeneira, Elaine J Abrams, Chloe A Teasdale
    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Survival and predictors of mortality among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in Hawassa comprehensive specialized hospital, Sidama regional state, Ethiopia
    Balta Bargude, Fanta Amanuel
    Journal of Advanced Pediatrics and Child Health.2022; 5(1): 042.     CrossRef
  • Anemia as a risk factor for tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yemataw Gelaw, Zegeye Getaneh, Mulugeta Melku
    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV patients after initiation of antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Melkalem Mamuye Azanaw, Nebiyu Mekonnen Derseh, Gebeyehu Shumuye Yetemegn, Dessie Abebaw Angaw
    Tropical Medicine and Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy on the Incidence of Tuberculosis among Seropositive Children Attending HIV/AIDS Care in Two General Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia, 2021
    Fassikaw Kebede, Birhanu Kebede, Tsehay Kebede, Melaku Agmasu, Maoshui Wang
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Time to Develop and Predictors for Incidence of Tuberculosis among Children Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy
    Fassikaw Kebede, Tsehay Kebede, Birhanu Kebede, Abebe Abate, Dube Jara, Belete Negese, Tamrat Shaweno, Karl Drlica
    Tuberculosis Research and Treatment.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effect of highly active antiretroviral treatment on TB incidence among HIV infected children and their clinical profile, retrospective cohort study, South West Ethiopia
    Firew Tiruneh, Yared Deyas
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Socioeconomic disparities and difficulties to access to healthcare services among Canadian children with neurodevelopmental disorders and disabilities
Sana Raouafi, Sofiane Achiche, Maxime Raison
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018010.   Published online March 29, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018010
  • 9,980 View
  • 201 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The aims of this study were to identify the associations of levels of severity of neurodevelopmental disorders and disabilities (NDD/D) in children with their household socioeconomic status (SES) and their frequency of visits to a healthcare provider, and to examine how the severity of disability varied with these determinants among NDD/D subgroups, in order to inform possible social policy changes and to improve access to the healthcare system.
METHODS
Data from the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey on children aged 5-14 years, collected by Statistics Canada, were analyzed (n=7,072 and weighted n=340,340). Children with NDD/D constituted those with impairments in motor, speech, neurosensory, and psychological functioning, as well as those who had issues with learning/cognition and social interactions. The weighted sample size for this group was n=111,630 (total sample size for children with limitations: n=174,810). We used logistic regression to assess the associations of household SES and frequency of visits to a healthcare provider with disability level. We included NDD/D subgroups as interaction terms in the model. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was conducted to develop a profile of disability level.
RESULTS
After-tax low income, family assistance, out-of-pocket expenses, needing but not receiving health services from a social worker, condition of the dwelling, and residential location were associated with the severity of NDD/D. Using MCA, 2 disability profiles could be identified based on access to healthcare, household income status, and condition of the dwelling.
CONCLUSIONS
More social interventions are needed to reduce difficulties in accessing healthcare and to diminish the socially determined health inequalities faced by children with NDD/D.
Summary
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Key Message

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Common neural substrates of diverse neurodevelopmental disorders
    H Moriah Sokolowski, Brian Levine
    Brain.2023; 146(2): 438.     CrossRef
  • Perceived household financial decline and physical/mental health among adolescents during the COVID-19 crisis: Focusing on gender differences
    Gahwan Yoo, Sou Hyun Jang
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 32: 102119.     CrossRef
  • Terminology and descriptions of navigation and related practices for children with neurodisability and their families: a scoping review
    Emily Gardiner, Vivian Wong, Grace Lin, Anton R. Miller
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parent Perspectives: Understanding the Postschool Concerns of Parents of Transition-Age Youth With Disabilities
    Kelli A. Sanderson, Jennifer L. Bumble
    Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals.2022; : 216514342211284.     CrossRef
  • Unmet Medical Needs and Food Insecurity in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Findings from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
    Rose Calixte, Elizabeth P. Helzner, Sumaiya Islam, Marlene Camacho-Rivera, Susmita Pati
    Children.2022; 9(12): 1798.     CrossRef
  • Exploring opportunities for holistic family care of parental caregivers of children with life-threatening or life-limiting illnesses
    Jill MG Bally, Meridith Burles, Nicole R Smith, Lorraine Holtslander, Chris Mpofu, Heather Hodgson-Viden, Marcelline Zimmer
    Qualitative Social Work.2021; 20(5): 1356.     CrossRef
  • A national harmonised data collection network for neurodevelopmental disorders: A transdiagnostic assessment protocol for neurodevelopment, mental health, functioning and well‐being
    Kelsie A. Boulton, David Coghill, Natalie Silove, Elizabeth Pellicano, Andrew J. O. Whitehouse, Mark A. Bellgrove, Nicole J. Rinehart, Suncica Lah, Marie‐Antoinette Redoblado‐Hodge, Nadia Badawi, Helen Heussler, Nicole Rogerson, Joshua Burns, Michelle A.
    JCPP Advances.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status and uptake of reproductive carrier screening in Australia
    Stephen J. Robson, Melody Caramins, Mirette Saad, Graeme Suthers
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.2020; 60(6): 976.     CrossRef
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    Kenji YOMODA
    Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences).2020; 65: 757.     CrossRef
  • A Real-World Analysis of Prescribing Patterns and Non-persistence of Anti-TNFα Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    Eun Jin Jang, Jung Eun Ha, Seul Gi Im, Myeong Gyu Kim, Hyun Soon Sohn
    Clinical Drug Investigation.2019; 39(7): 625.     CrossRef
  • Long-term effectiveness and safety of varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy in people with neurodevelopmental disorders: A prospective cohort study
    Taha Itani, Dheeraj Rai, Tim Jones, Gemma M. J. Taylor, Kyla H. Thomas, Richard M. Martin, Marcus R. Munafò, Neil M. Davies, Amy E. Taylor
    Scientific Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health