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Original Article
Misconceptions and stigma against people living with HIV/AIDS: a cross-sectional study from the 2017 Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey
Desi Suantari
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021094.   Published online November 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021094
  • 7,416 View
  • 148 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Data are not available in Indonesia to measure the main indicators of zero new infections, zero acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related deaths and zero discrimination. This study aimed to determine factors related to misconceptions about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and the stigma against people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Indonesia
METHODS
This cross-sectional study used secondary data from the 2017 Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey (IDHS). The sample was women and men aged 17-45 years and married (n=3,023).
RESULTS
Education and wealth index quintile were significantly related to misconceptions about HIV transmission. Respondents with low levels of education were more likely to have misconceptions about HIV transmission. Respondents who were in the poorest, poorer, middle, and richer quintiles of the wealth index were more likely to have misconceptions about HIV transmission than those in the richest quintile. Educational level, employment status, and wealth index quintile were predictors of stigma against PLWHA.
CONCLUSIONS
There are still many Indonesian people with misconceptions about HIV transmission and stigma against PLWHA. Future studies should focus on educational programs or interventions aimed at increasing public knowledge and awareness, promoting compassion towards PLWHA, and emphasizing respect for the rights of PLWHA. These interventions are particularly important for populations who are uneducated and living in poverty.
Summary
Key Message
Many Indonesians still experience misconceptions about HIV transmission and stigmatize PLWHA. Educational programs or interventions are needed to increase public knowledge and awareness, promoting compassion towards PLWHA, and emphasizing respect for the rights of PLWHA, particularly among the poor and uneducated.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence and sociodemographic determinants of public stigma towards people with HIV and its impact on HIV testing uptake: A cross‐sectional study in 64 low‐ and middle‐income countries
    Ana Mendez‐Lopez, Trenton M. White, María José Fuster‐RuizdeApodaca, Jeffrey V. Lazarus
    HIV Medicine.2024; 25(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Stigmatizing and discriminatory attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) among general adult population: the results from the 6th Thai National Health Examination Survey (NHES VI)
    Sineenart Chautrakarn, Parichat Ong-Artborirak, Warangkana Naksen, Aksara Thongprachum, Jukkrit Wungrath, Suwat Chariyalertsak, Scott Stonington, Surasak Taneepanichskul, Sawitri Assanangkornchai, Pattapong Kessomboon, Nareemarn Neelapaichit, Wichai Aekpl
    Journal of Global Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factor Associated with HIV/AIDS knowledge among males: Findings from 2017-18 Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey
    Jamal Abdul Nasir, Muhammad Danish Khan, Syed Arif Ahmed Zaidi
    Journal of Biosocial Science.2023; 55(6): 1169.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge of HIV/AIDS and its determinants in India: Findings from the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019– 2021)
    Mansi Malik, Siaa Girotra, Debolina Roy, Saurav Basu
    Population Medicine.2023; 5(May): 1.     CrossRef
Brief Communication
Effect of premature rupture of membranes on preterm labor: a case-control study in Cilegon, Indonesia
Ita Marlita Sari, Asri C. Adisasmita, Sabarinah Prasetyo, Dwirani Amelia, Ratih Purnamasari
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020025.   Published online April 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020025
  • 12,274 View
  • 279 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The global prevalence of preterm labor is approximately 11.1% of live births. However, preterm labor contributes to 75-80% of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The morbidity experienced by preterm infants may continue to influence their subsequent development, imposing physical, psychological, and economic burdens. Premature rupture of membranes (PROM) is a causal factor that may affect preterm birth. Previous studies have shown an association between PROM and preterm labor, but this association should be investigated in more diverse populations. Therefore, this study was conducted in Cilegon, Indonesia to determine the magnitude of the risk of preterm labor associated with PROM at Cilegon Hospital from July 2014 to December 2015.
METHODS
This case-control study used data from patients’ medical records. The cases were all mothers who delivered at less than 37 weeks of gestation, while the control population comprised all mothers who delivered at greater or equal to 37 weeks. The data were analyzed using logistic regression.
RESULTS
The bivariate analysis yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 2.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 4.59) before controlling for covariates. The model derived through multiple regression analysis after controlling for education, history of preterm labor, and anemia resulted in an OR of 2.58 (95% CI, 1.68 to 3.98).
CONCLUSIONS
Mothers who experience PROM during pregnancy were at a 2.58 times higher risk of preterm labor after controlling for education, history of preterm labor, and anemia.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Experience in the use of immunochromatographic test of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the diagnosis of premature rupture of fetal membranes
    S.V. Barinov, T.V. Kadtsyna, Yu.I. Tirskaya, O.V. Lazareva, Yu.I. Chulovskii, I.N. Zyryanova, O.Yu. Zhivotchenko, M.B. Kazakova, A.D. Orlitskaya
    Rossiiskii vestnik akushera-ginekologa.2024; 24(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Maternal low and high hemoglobin concentrations and associations with adverse maternal and infant health outcomes: an updated global systematic review and meta-analysis
    Melissa F. Young, Brietta M. Oaks, Hannah Paige Rogers, Sonia Tandon, Reynaldo Martorell, Kathryn G. Dewey, Amanda S. Wendt
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • High Apoptotic Index in Amniotic Membrane of Pregnant Women is A Risk Factor for Preterm Labor
    Anak Agung Gede Putra Wiradnyana, Anak Agung Ngurah Jaya Kusuma, Anak Agung Ngurah Anantasika, I Made Darmayasa, Ryan Saktika Mulyana, Gde Bagus Rizky Kornia
    European Journal of Medical and Health Sciences.2023; 5(3): 79.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of prematurity in urban Indonesia: a meta-analysis
    Putri Maharani Tristanita Marsubrin, Naufal Arkan Abiyyu Ibrahim, Mohammad Adya Firmansha Dilmy, Yulia Ariani, Budi Wiweko, Rima Irwinda, Achmad Kemal Harzif, Badriul Hegar, Ray Wagiu Basrowi
    Journal of Perinatal Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Prospective Cohort Study of Etiology and Neonatal Outcome of Preterm Labor in a Tertiary-care Hospital Attached to a Medical College
    NS Sreedevi, Srijana Mathai, Rachel Mathew, Suja M Mani
    Journal of South Asian Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.2022; 14(3): 253.     CrossRef
  • A Scoping Review of Preterm Births in Sub-Saharan Africa: Burden, Risk Factors and Outcomes
    Adam Mabrouk, Amina Abubakar, Ezra Kipngetich Too, Esther Chongwo, Ifedayo M. Adetifa
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(17): 10537.     CrossRef
Perspective
Strategies for an effective tobacco harm reduction policy in Indonesia
Fariz Nurwidya, Fumiyuki Takahashi, Hario Baskoro, Moulid Hidayat, Faisal Yunus, Kazuhisa Takahashi
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014035.   Published online December 10, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014035
  • 17,638 View
  • 195 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
Tobacco consumption is a major causative agent for various deadly diseases such as coronary artery disease and cancer. It is the largest avoidable health risk in the world, causing more problems than alcohol, drug use, high blood pressure, excess body weight or high cholesterol. As countries like Indonesia prepare to develop national policy guidelines for tobacco harm reduction, the scientific community can help by providing continuous ideas and a forum for sharing and distributing information, drafting guidelines, reviewing best practices, raising funds, and establishing partnerships. We propose several strategies for reducing tobacco consumption, including advertisement interference, cigarette pricing policy, adolescent smoking prevention policy, support for smoking cessation therapy, special informed consent for smokers, smoking prohibition in public spaces, career incentives, economic incentives, and advertisement incentives. We hope that these strategies would assist people to avoid starting smoking or in smoking cessation.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Affecting Secondhand Smoke Avoidance Behavior of Vietnamese Adolescents
    Ja-yin Lee, Hyunmi Ahn, Hyeonkyeong Lee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(8): 1632.     CrossRef

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