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The association between occupational stress level and health-related productivity loss among Korean employees
Jonghee Chung, Jin-Hyo Kim, Jae Yoon Lee, Hee Seok Kang, Dong-wook Lee, Yun-Chul Hong, Mo-Yeol Kang
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023009.   Published online December 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023009
  • 5,189 View
  • 250 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Occupational stress management is particularly important for successful business operations, since occupational stress adversely affects workers’ health, eventually lowering their productivity. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the correlation between occupational stress and health-related productivity loss (HRPL) among Korean workers.
METHODS
In 2021, 1,078 workers participated in a web-based questionnaire survey. HRPL was measured using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire, and occupational stress was measured using the Korean Occupational Stress Scale-Short Form. The occupational stress level was divided into tertiles (low, intermediate, and high), and the low occupational stress group was used as the reference group. Using a generalised linear model, differences in labour productivity loss according to the level of occupational stress were tested after adjusting for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, education level, household income, occupation, and underlying medical conditions.
RESULTS
Non-parametric regression analysis of HRPL according to occupational stress showed a direct association between occupational stress and HRPL. A statistically significant difference was observed in HRPL between participants with intermediate and high occupational stress and those with low occupational stress.
CONCLUSIONS
Our results support the hypothesis that high occupational stress is associated with decreased labour productivity.
Summary
Korean summary
직무스트레스가 건강에 미치는 영향은 잘 알려져 있으나, 노동생산성에 대해 분석한 결과는 그동안 부족하였다. 한국 노동자 1078명을 분석한 결과, 직무스트레스가 낮은 군에 비해서 중등도이거나 높은 경우, 결근이나 프리젠티즘과 같은 건강관련 노동생산성 손실이 약 20%p 정도 높은 것으로 분석되었다.
Key Message
As a result of analyzing 1078 Korean workers, it was revealed that health-related labor productivity losses such as absenteeism and presenteeism were about 20%p higher when occupational stress was moderate or high compared to the low occupational stress group.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between work from home and health-related productivity loss among Korean employees
    Hyo Jeong Kim, Dong Wook Lee, Jaesung Choi, Yun‐Chul Hong, Mo-Yeol Kang
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
The associations of job strain and leisure-time physical activity with the risk of hypertension: the population-based Midlife in the United States cohort study
Xinyue Liu, Timothy A. Matthews, Liwei Chen, Jian Li
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022073.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022073
  • 6,705 View
  • 227 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Job strain is positively associated with incident hypertension, while increasing leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) can reduce incident hypertension. However, the joint associations of job strain and LTPA with incident hypertension among United States workers have yet to be investigated. This study examined the independent and joint associations of job strain and LTPA with incident hypertension.
METHODS
This prospective cohort study (n=1,160) utilized data from the population-based Midlife in the United States study. The associations of job strain and LTPA at baseline with incident hypertension during follow-up were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. High job strain was derived from a combination of high job demands and low job control, and high LTPA was defined as engagement in moderate or vigorous LTPA at least once per week.
RESULTS
During 9,218 person-years of follow-up, the hypertension incidence rate was 30.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.3 to 34.3) per 1,000 person-years. High job strain was associated with a higher risk for hypertension than low job strain (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.67). High LTPA was associated with lower hypertension risk than low LTPA (aHR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.98). Hypertension risk was higher among workers with high job strain and low LTPA than among those with low job strain and high LTPA (aHR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.43).
CONCLUSIONS
Job strain and LTPA showed positive and inverse associations, respectively, with incident hypertension. The combination of high job strain and low LTPA was associated with the highest risk for hypertension.
Summary
Key Message
High job strain and low leisure-time physical activity are independent risk factors for hypertension among workers, and those with high job strain and low leisure-time physical activity are at the highest risk, so it is critical that policy interventions target job strain and leisure-time physical activity to reduce hypertension.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • 2023 ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension The Task Force for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension
    Giuseppe Mancia, Reinhold Kreutz, Mattias Brunström, Michel Burnier, Guido Grassi, Andrzej Januszewicz, Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Konstantinos Tsioufis, Enrico Agabiti-Rosei, Engi Abd Elhady Algharably, Michel Azizi, Athanase Benetos, Claudio Borghi, Jana Br
    Journal of Hypertension.2023; 41(12): 1874.     CrossRef
  • Adulthood Psychosocial Disadvantages and Risk of Hypertension in U.S. Workers: Effect Modification by Adverse Childhood Experiences
    Timothy A. Matthews, Yifang Zhu, Wendie Robbins, Mary Rezk-Hanna, Paul M. Macey, Yeonsu Song, Jian Li
    Life.2022; 12(10): 1507.     CrossRef
  • Associations of COVID-19 Related Work Stressors with Psychological Distress: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Californian Workers
    Timothy A. Matthews, Megan Guardiano, Negar Omidakhsh, Lara Cushing, Wendie Robbins, OiSaeng Hong, Jian Li
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 144.     CrossRef

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