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Association between body temperature and leukocyte telomere length in Korean middle-aged and older adults
Carolina García-García, Chol Shin, Inkyung Baik
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021063.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021063
  • 8,421 View
  • 209 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Data on associations between body temperature (BT) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which has been widely used as a biomarker of cellular senescence in recent epidemiological studies, are limited. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the associations between a normal BT range (35.0-37.5°C) and LTL via 6-year longitudinal observations of 2,004 male and female adults aged 50 or older.
METHODS
BT was obtained by measuring the tympanic temperature, and relative LTL was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Robust regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the baseline and follow-up LTL values and their differences.
RESULTS
A significant inverse association was found between BT and LTL at baseline. The regression coefficient estimate was -0.03 (95% confidence interval, -0.07 to -0.001; p<0.05). This association was stronger in participants with a body mass index >25 kg/m<sup>2</sup> and males (p<0.01). However, there were no associations between BT and LTL at follow-up or BT and 6-year longitudinal differences in LTL.
CONCLUSIONS
These findings suggest that having a high BT between 35°C and 37.5°C (95°F and 99°F) may be detrimental for obese individuals in terms of biological aging.
Summary
Korean summary
본 역학 연구는 한국 성인 2,004명을 연구대상자로 하여 2011-2012년에 고막 체온을 측정하고 전혈을 채취하여 백혈구 텔로미어 길이를 분석하였으며 이러한 분석을 2017-2018년에 반복하여 6년 동안의 백혈구 텔로미어 길이 변화를 계산하였다. 고막 체온과 초기 텔로미어 길이의 관련성을 분석한 결과, 정상 체온 범위 내 체온이 높을수록 텔로미어 길이가 유의적으로 짧아지는 생리적 노화 상태와 관련된 것으로 나타났으며, 이러한 결과는 비만할 경우 더욱 분명하게 나타났다. 본 연구 결과를 통해 비만 시 체내 열발생과 관련된 노화 진행이 체중 감소를 통해 지연될 수 있는 가능성이 제시되었다.
Key Message
In an epidemiological study including Korean adults, a relatively higher normal body temperature between 35°C to 37.5°C was found to be associated with shorter leukocyte telomere length, a cellular senescence biomarker. In particular, this association was observed to be stronger among obese participants, suggesting that attaining normal body weight may be beneficial for anti-aging.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Higher Daily Air Temperature Is Associated with Shorter Leukocyte Telomere Length: KORA F3 and KORA F4
    Wenli Ni, Kathrin Wolf, Susanne Breitner, Siqi Zhang, Nikolaos Nikolaou, Cavin K. Ward-Caviness, Melanie Waldenberger, Christian Gieger, Annette Peters, Alexandra Schneider
    Environmental Science & Technology.2022; 56(24): 17815.     CrossRef
Modification of the effect of ambient air temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality by air pollution in Ahvaz, Iran
Sohrab Iranpour, Soheila Khodakarim, Abbas Shahsavani, Ardeshir Khosravi, Koorosh Etemad
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020053.   Published online July 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020053
  • 9,725 View
  • 218 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study investigated the modification of temperature effects on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality by air pollutants (particulate matter less than 2.5 and 10 µm in diameter [respectively], ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide).
METHODS
Poisson additive models with a penalized distributed lag non-linear model were used to assess the association of air temperature with the daily number of deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in Ahvaz, Iran from March 21, 2014 to March 20, 2018, controlling for day of the week, holidays, relative humidity, wind speed, air pollutants, and seasonal and long-term trends. Subgroup analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect modification for sex and age group. To assess the modification of air pollutants on temperature effects, the level of each pollutant was categorized as either greater than the median value or less than/equal to the median value.
RESULTS
We found no significant associations between temperature and cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. In the subgroup analyses, however, high temperatures were significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality among those 75 years old and older, with the strongest effect observed on day 0 relative to exposure. The results revealed a lack of interactive effects between temperature and air pollutants on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality.
CONCLUSIONS
A weak but significant association was found between high temperature and cardiovascular mortality, but only in elderly people. Air pollution did not significantly modify the effect of ambient temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations between ambient temperature and suicide: а systematic review
    Andrej М. Grjibovski, Ivan М. Kobelev, Natalia N. Kukalevskaya, Yulia A. Popova, Alexander V. Baranov
    Ekologiya cheloveka (Human Ecology).2023; 30(6): 399.     CrossRef
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Empirical model for estimating dengue incidence using temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity: a 19-year retrospective analysis in East Delhi
Vishnampettai G. Ramachandran, Priyamvada Roy, Shukla Das, Narendra Singh Mogha, Ajay Kumar Bansal
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016052.   Published online November 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016052
  • 16,548 View
  • 359 Download
  • 24 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Aedes mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting the dengue virus. The mosquito lifecycle is known to be influenced by temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity. This retrospective study was planned to investigate whether climatic factors could be used to predict the occurrence of dengue in East Delhi.
METHODS
The number of monthly dengue cases reported over 19 years was obtained from the laboratory records of our institution. Monthly data of rainfall, temperature, and humidity collected from a local weather station were correlated with the number of monthly reported dengue cases. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyse whether the climatic parameters differed significantly among seasons. Four models were developed using negative binomial generalized linear model analysis. Monthly rainfall, temperature, humidity, were used as independent variables, and the number of dengue cases reported monthly was used as the dependent variable. The first model considered data from the same month, while the other three models involved incorporating data with a lag phase of 1, 2, and 3 months, respectively.
RESULTS
The greatest number of cases was reported during the post-monsoon period each year. Temperature, rainfall, and humidity varied significantly across the pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon periods. The best correlation between these three climatic factors and dengue occurrence was at a time lag of 2 months.
CONCLUSIONS
This study found that temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity significantly affected dengue occurrence in East Delhi. This weather-based dengue empirical model can forecast potential outbreaks 2-month in advance, providing an early warning system for intensifying dengue control measures.
Summary

Citations

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    Zhuanzhuan Liu, Qingxin Zhang, Liya Li, Junjie He, Jinyang Guo, Zichen Wang, Yige Huang, Zimeng Xi, Fei Yuan, Yiji Li, Tingting Li
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Journal of Public Health.2021; 29(2): 433.     CrossRef
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Fever screening and detection of febrile arrivals at an international airport in Korea: association among self-reported fever, infrared thermal camera scanning, and tympanic temperature
Kyung Sook Cho, Jangho Yoon
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014004.   Published online May 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014004
  • 29,198 View
  • 190 Download
  • 25 Web of Science
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this research was to measure fever prevalence and the effectiveness of a fever screening procedure in detecting febrile arrivals at an international airport in Korea.
METHODS
Data were retrieved from arrivals’ health declaration forms and questionnaires for febrile arrivals at an international airport collected by a national quarantine station during the year 2012. Self-reported health declaration forms were returned by 355,887 arrivals (61% of the total arrivals). Of these, 608 symptomatic arrivals (0.2%) including 6 febrile arrivals were analyzed.
RESULTS
Fever prevalence at an international airport in Korea was 0.002%. Self-reported fever was significantly positively associated with tympanic temperature (p<0.001). The difference between the thermal camera temperature (36.83°C) and tympanic (or ear) temperature (38.14°C) was not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS
The findings imply that a procedure for mass detection of fever such as self-reported questionnaires and thermal camera scanning may serve as an effective tool for detecting febrile arrivals at quarantine stations. Future research can benefit from looking at the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the entry screening system.
Summary
Korean summary
2003년 전 세계적인 SARS 대 유행 이후, 우리나라는 증상을 자가보고 하도록 하는 검역질문서, 열감지 카메라를 통한 체온 측정, 고막체온 측정 등과 같은 검역절차들이 상호 유기적으로 작용할 수 있도록 검역체계를 강화해 왔다. 그러나 이러한 검역절차들이 얼마나 효과적으로 작용하고 있는지, 그리고 이를 통해 실제로 발열환자가 얼마나 발견되고 있는지에 대한 연구는 전무하였다. 그러한 점에서 본 연구는 이러한 연구 질문에 대한 우리나라 최초의 시도로서, 검역 행정뿐만 아니라 향후 보다 발전된 후속 연구를 위한 기초자료로도 활용될 수 있을 것이다.

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